ONE MORE YEAR

http://britbachmann.com

Cadboro bait, 02/13

(Source: Flickr / britbach)

CARDBOARD FOX

Currently on display at the corner of Lawrence and Ethel in downtown Kelowna is an interactive cardboard sculpture by Corie Waugh. 

With the gracious (and very illegal) use of electricity from an adjacent city-owned building, musicians are scheduled to perform live music all day until the cardboard is dismantled tonight. Visual artists from around the Okanagan have also been invited to hang work on the walls for the duration of the sculpture. 

Cardboard Fox is the first of many similar popup sculptures that will blossom around Kelowna in the upcoming months.

And if you find yourself downtown in the next few hours (and especially if you have a few spare tarps lying around), check it out! 

My current exhibition is at Gallery Vertigo in Vernon, BC. It is titled Sophia, based on the sinking of the SS Princess Sophia in 1918. Twelve artists contributed to the show, all from Renay Egami’s advanced sculpture class at UBCO.
Sophia runs until the end of the month, with a closing reception Thursday, March 1st between 7-9pm.
(Invite design by Jeremy Shantz)

My current exhibition is at Gallery Vertigo in Vernon, BC. It is titled Sophia, based on the sinking of the SS Princess Sophia in 1918. Twelve artists contributed to the show, all from Renay Egami’s advanced sculpture class at UBCO.

Sophia runs until the end of the month, with a closing reception Thursday, March 1st between 7-9pm.

(Invite design by Jeremy Shantz)

And now for something a hell of a lot more sexy-

(Sculpture by Ron Mueck)

I remember I wanted to get to non-art, non connotive, non anthropomorphic, non geometric, non, nothing, everything, but of another kind, vision, sort.
Eva Hesse, from a catalogue of her artwork, 1969.

Kapoor at Beaux Arts

The mystery is over- Anish Kapoor is the latest artist to exhibit work at l’École des Beaux Arts. 


His series, Cement Works is set up in the school’s chapel, Chapelle des Petits-Augustins.

Here is an excerpt of the artist statement:

"These works bear witness to the artist’s interest in self-generation, a concept inherited from the Sanskrit word svayambh. In essence, Anish Kapoor’s sculptures give the sensation of not having been created by human hand and of having always been there, following the example of certain astoundingly beautiful forms built up over thousands of years by the forces of nature: one thinks of coral ounds or certain rocky outcrops…”

Cement Works is on display Tuesday-Sunday, 11-7 until June 11th.

Musée Rodin, 79 Rue de Varenne, Paris 7
http://www.musee-rodin.fr/

Musée Rodin, 79 Rue de Varenne, Paris 7

http://www.musee-rodin.fr/

My friend, Alyson recently turned me onto Kate MccGwire’s feather sculptures. Although I find them beautiful and fascinating, I am oddly repulsed by them. The motion of the feathers is nauseating. Having said that, the gut reaction that I receive from these pieces is what makes me feel so drawn to MccGwire’s work. Her sculptures are sickeningly magnificent! 
http://www.katemccgwire.com/

My friend, Alyson recently turned me onto Kate MccGwire’s feather sculptures. Although I find them beautiful and fascinating, I am oddly repulsed by them. The motion of the feathers is nauseating. Having said that, the gut reaction that I receive from these pieces is what makes me feel so drawn to MccGwire’s work. Her sculptures are sickeningly magnificent! 

http://www.katemccgwire.com/

Murakami at le Chateau de Versailles

Tongari-Kun, Salon d’Hercule

Yesterday I went to the Takashi Murakami exhibit at le Château de Versailles. It was my first Murakami experience and hopefully, it won’t be my last. His works are completely jaw-dropping! I am getting ahead of myself- Murakami’s introduction explains it all :

For Japanese, myself included, the Château de Versailles is one of the great symbols in Western history. It is emblematic of an elegance, sophistication, and artistic ambition that most of us could only dream of. We understand, of course, that the fuse that sparked the fires of revolution led right through the centre of the building. But in many ways, it all comes across as a fantastic tale from a kingdom far, far away. Just as the people of France might find it difficult to recreate in their minds an accurate image of the age of the Samurai, so too does the story of the palace become one that is, for us, diluted of reality. Thus, it is likely that the Versailles of my imagination is one that my mind has exaggerated and transformed until it has become a kind of surreal world of its own. It is this that I have tried to capture in this exhibition. I am The Cheshire Cat who greets Alice in Wonderland, and chatters on as she wanders around the Château. With my playful smile, I invite you all to the Wonderland of Versailles.

Jellyfish Eyes : Max&Shimon, Salon de Mars

J, Salle des Gardes

The Simple Things, Salon des Nobles

Yume Lion (The Dream Lion), Salon d’Apollon

Kawaii - Summer Vacation in the Kingdom of the Golden & Untitled (Carpet), Salle des Gardes du Roi

Miss ko2, Salon de la Guerre

Oval Buddha Silver, Salon de l’Abondance

Kinoko Isu (Medium & Large), Salon de Mercure

The exhibition showcases a total of 22 pieces, eleven of which were created specifically for le Château de Versailles. Murakami Versailles is curated by Laurent Le Bon, director of the Centre Pompidou-Metz. It runs from September 14 - December 12, 2010. 

Detroit

As some of you know, I am fascinated and borderline obsessed with the artistic goings-on of Detroit. Although the tragic domino effects of the economic recession are evident there, so is the blossoming art scene. 

As a little history intro, Detroit was once considered the world’s automotive manufacturing capital. With that reputation came enough wealth and prestige for the city to be labelled, “Paris of the Midwest.” However - as popularized by the US media - Detroit is more recently known for its unemployment rates, abandoned buildings and high crime statistics. 

In the case of many artistic movements, such destitute circumstances usually yield artistic evolution. Detroit is a perfect example of this! In the words of Richard Rogers, president of the College for Creative Studies in Detroit, “Artists are moving in from other parts of the world to experience this energy that seems to de developing… [they] go into places that other people aren’t interested in and transform them.” (Quote courtesy of “Detroit a Hotbed of Cool Art” in The Globe and Mail, March 2010.)

To give you a little sample of the guerrilla art emerging from Detroit, here is a photo of The Ice House by Gregory Holm and Matthew Radune.

The Ice House is just one of hundreds of abandoned properties that are being radically transformed into installation art. 

Another artist taking advantage of Detroit’s dismal housing market is Ben Wolf. He was recently featured on the Juxtapoz Magazine website for his sculptures. Refer to the image below.

Ben Wolf article : http://www.juxtapoz.com/Juxtapoz+Live+in+Detroit/28659-salvaging-sections-of-abandoned-spaces-for-sculpture-with-ben-wolf

All this free-flowing creativity would not have been possible, however, without Tyree Guyton’s non-profit Heidelberg Project paving the way. Created in 1986, the Heidelberg Project was Guyton’s way of transforming his childhood neighbourhood into a canvas for artistic expression. Rather than acting solely as an interactive gallery, the project’s initiative was to unify the community after the 1967 Detroit Riots, from which the city had never fully covered. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1967_Detroit_riot)

http://www.heidelberg.org/

What I find so fascinating about Detroit’s art scene is that the city has come to represent that regardless of the condition of our capitalist society, art can always unify. I believe my sentiment is best summarized by 30 Rock’s Liz Lemon -

"I want to go to there."