ONE MORE YEAR

http://britbachmann.com

CREEP and a question of ‘digital publishing’

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You can check out the rest here. (And no, they are not naked.) 

"CREEP is a culture magazine. 

We stalk subcultures, fashion, music, art, and design. 

We believe in self-expression, drag queens, and 1985 Pete Burns. 3AM pizza runs, warehouse parties, and not being an asshole. It is appropriate to drink a Slurpee in the middle of winter. We believe in Value Village, black pants, and sneaking into Fashion Week. Wear whatever you want. We believe in white space, organized clutter, and hot summers. 

You are beautiful. And we are secretly watching you.”

-An artist statement and manifesto taken from Creep Magazine’s profile.

This magazine has just launched their first issue via issuu.com, a digital publishing platform. CREEP is currently Vancouver-based, although that’s bound to change as Editor-In-Chief, Zarah Cheng jets off to NYC this summer. Additional contributors - and cover girls - include Josefa Cameron as Music Editor, and Paulette Cameron as Art Editor. When these ladies aren’t writing and painting the town, they compose 3/4 of the band Hooves.

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CREEP enchants me and not just for its content, which I am sure will only get better as the flowers bloom. I am enchanted by the concept of online publishing. While I thought my fascination was a recent development, upon closer consideration I realized that the creation of this particular blog marks my seduction into the world of online publishing. Tumblr is to online publishing, what Animal Collective is to hallucinogens. Beautiful gateways. 

Tonight I was at an ebook launch for Randy Lee Cutler, which I will document in a future post. Randy Lee said that her pitch was rejected by a publisher who claimed that books by ‘local’ artists never sell. E-publishing was her only solution; it also solved the problem of distributing her books to a mass audience without the circulation and marketing infrastructure that publishing houses provide.

I have decided that digital publishing will be a new undercurrent in this blog, some reoccurring food for thought. While I like the idea of online publishing, I am not entirely convinced that the publishing house is obsolete. Have self-publishers appropriated the genre in the same way that Instagram users have appropriated photography? Only time will tell. 

In the meantime, let us support indie publishing in all forms! You can follow Creep Magazine for free here

Congrats to Z,J &P. I leave you with this-

Me, photographed in my studio for Native Shoes’ Community Lookbook here.
Photos and interview questions by Paulette Cameron.

Me, photographed in my studio for Native Shoes’ Community Lookbook here.

Photos and interview questions by Paulette Cameron.

Ronette Pulaski in the Twin Peaks pilot episode. 

Ronette Pulaski in the Twin Peaks pilot episode. 

"Fake Gypsy Witch Card feat. Teeth" 
(before colour)
April, 2014

"Fake Gypsy Witch Card feat. Teeth" 

(before colour)

April, 2014

BAF

Last week I went to the opening of the Burrard Arts Foundation, a new organization dedicated to the development and exhibition of artworks in urban environments. In addition to being the organization’s official debut - exempting the impressive Janet Echelman installation they hosted in March - last week’s opening featured a group exhibition curated by Wil Aballe called Post Rem, an installation by Erik Otto, and a residency exhibition by Joseph Staples. 

While it wasn’t necessarily apparent during the opening, one of my main attractions to BAF is that their mandate almost entirely focuses on promoting larger public works, which is a stance not often taken by arts organizations. Size matters. The current reality for an artist in their mid-20’s in Vancouver is scaling works to fit smaller galleries and pop-up exhibition spaces. BAF seems keen to change that.

My only criticism for BAF is a simple event planning oversight; the people working were unable to answer any questions I had about the organization. And while they provided informative handouts with artist bios, etc, it left basic questions unanswered. The women working the bar didn’t even know the director’s name. (Christian Chan, if you were wondering.) Hiring people to help manage an event is only effective if they are provided with talking points, otherwise it is tacky. 

Regardless of your medium, it is an exciting time to be an artist in Vancouver right now. The Vancouver Biennale is importing international artists to install public works over the next few years, and now BAF is also seeking to establish itself in the urban landscape. It is hard not to see the parallels, and to assume that these two non-profit charitable organizations will be developing a symbiotic relationship over the next few years, if they haven’t already.

Burrard Arts Foundation is located at 108 East Broadway. More info on their website- burrardarts.org

perfect day

perfect day

"Fake Gypsy Witch Card feat. Poodle"
April, 2014

"Fake Gypsy Witch Card feat. Poodle"

April, 2014

A ‘whimsical’ Vonnegut drawing featured by The New Yorker in anticipation of the May 13th release of Kurt Vonnegut Drawings, a collection of illustrations edited by Nanette Vonnegut. 
Also in the feature is a fine KV quote from “Fates Worst Than Death”:
“My own means of making a living is essentially clerical, and hence tedious and constipating.… The making of pictures is to writing what laughing gas is to the Asian influenza.”

A ‘whimsical’ Vonnegut drawing featured by The New Yorker in anticipation of the May 13th release of Kurt Vonnegut Drawings, a collection of illustrations edited by Nanette Vonnegut. 

Also in the feature is a fine KV quote from “Fates Worst Than Death”:

“My own means of making a living is essentially clerical, and hence tedious and constipating.… The making of pictures is to writing what laughing gas is to the Asian influenza.”

(Source: newyorker.com)

BOMB Magazine — Jonathan Wang by Harry J. Weil

(Source: bombmagazine)

MARRIAGE EXPERIMENT

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Last week I watched two of my friends get married in a small, quiet ceremony on the unbroken ground of the new Emily Carr campus. It was a moving ceremony, rushed because of the rain, but not without the charm and formalities of a traditional wedding. The only difference is that it wasn’t a traditional wedding; it was an art piece by Catherine de Montreuil, in collaboration with Aidan Whiteley. This civil ceremony marked the beginning of Catherine’s interdisciplinary exploration into the institution of marriage. Here is her statement:

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I expected to laugh during the ceremony, but instead I cried. It was moving watching two people I admire so much embark on an adventure. And while their marriage is very much an open one and will not follow any sort of white-picket-fence expectations, I couldn’t shake the feeling that something very serious was happening in front of me while the vows were being read. Binding yourself to another person or persons is a ritual as old as the human race, and I felt that standing there in the mud. Marriage, as Catherine will explore, comes laden with connotations that the triviality of a spontaneous art gathering cannot dissolve. 

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Catherine de Montreuil is a young artist worth keeping an eye on- If not to watch the outcome of her and Aidan’s marriage over the next few years, then to watch her develop into a fearless interdisciplinary artist who calls Vancouver home.

Catherine de Montreuil on Tumblr